The Carl Heiland Lecture Series takes place on Wednesdays at 4:00 PM during the fall and spring semesters.  Each week, we are joined by a distinguished speaker from academia, industry, or government on a topic pertinent to the geosciences. The lecture series is a public event open to all members of the Mines community and beyond.

This fall, some Heiland lectures will be offered in person on campus in CTLM 102 and others will only be offered virtually via Zoom. A Zoom link will be available for all presentations so that you can attend from wherever you are in the world.  Locations are indicated in the Fall 2021 schedule below. 

Fall 2021 Schedule

September 1, 2021

Geological Knowledge Discovery using Machine Augmented Intelligence

Dr. Eun-Jung Holden 
School of Earth Sciences, The University of Western Australia

Virtual presentation

Abstract

Geological interpretation is a complex task where an interpreter’s bias plays an important role.  As a result, interpretation outcomes are variable and uncertain; nevertheless, these outcomes form the basis of decisions with significant environmental, social and financial implications.  With the increasing use of artificial intelligence and machine learning in our daily lives such as for information search, online shopping, and virtual assistant AI, the geoscience domain has also been active in the uptake of machine learning and AI to assist in interpreting geology from data.

This talk presents innovative machine-assisted technologies that improve the efficiency and the robustness of geological interpretation of different types of geodata used in the resource industry.   A number of applications of machine learning were developed in collaboration with the mining industry for the analysis and integration of multi-modal drill hole data.  These applications integrate the algorithms and workflows to assist human decisions.  The approach is to provide end users the control of the algorithmic process as much as possible and to enable a seamless integration of algorithms in the interpreter’s workflow using interactive visualisation.  This talk also presents on-going AI research that extracts geological insights from documents using machine reading of text.  It applies advanced text mining methods and constructs a graph based knowledge base called a knowledge graph to store and access geological information.  Case studies on different mineral deposits demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods for rapidly and robustly transforming text data into structured information that faithfully represents the contents of the source reports.

Speaker bio

Professor Holden received her BSc, MSc and PhD in computer science from the University of Western Australia (UWA).  Her postgraduate and postdoctoral research focused on developing visualisation, automated image analysis and machine learning techniques for hand gesture recognition.  Then in 2006, she made a transition to geoscience and currently leads the Geodata Algorithms Team at UWA.  The team effectively spans the boundaries of computational science and geoscience and links academia and industry.  The team’s research resulted in the commercialisation of three software products, namely CET Grid Analysis and CET Porphyry Detection extensions for Oasis Monaj, and televiewer image analysis methods in the Image & Structure Interpretation workspace for ALT’s WellCAD.  These products have had significant uptake by the resource industry globally.   Recently, their research has resulted in two industry driven patent applications on machine assisted drillhole data interpretation methods.  Professor Holden leads a major industry funded research engagement named the UWA-Rio Tinto Iron Ore Data Fusion Projects.  Her team won the UWA Vice Chancellor Award in Impact and Innovation in 2015 and she was a winner of the Women in Technology in WA (WiTWA) Tech [+] 20 Awards in 2019.

To receive the Zoom link for this presentation contact Ge Jin at gjin@mines.edu or Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu.

 

 

September 8, 2021

Development of an Ice Forecast System for Navigational Support and Emergency Response

Eric Anderson
Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

In person: CTLM 102

Abstract

Decreasing trends in seasonal ice duration and concentration have a range of impacts on the ecosystem and coastal communities. In response to changes in ice conditions, commercial shipping is looking to expand its season in several areas around the world, including along the Alaskan coast, the Arctic Sea, and in the Great Lakes. Consequently, this leads to an increase in Coast Guard operations including search and rescue, spill response, and ice-cutting for safe navigation. For each of these cases, accurate information on weather, sea, and ice conditions is critical to protect life and property. However, often forecasts for ice conditions are not available or have limited forecast skill. In the Great Lakes, an operational ice forecast system currently does not exist; thus, commercial shippers and the Coast Guard must rely on satellite-based information or shipping reports, which can be several hours or days out of date. For marginal ice zones or under dynamic conditions, these observations may not reflect current or near-future conditions and can lead to ships beset in ice, contaminant spills, or loss of life. We have developed a coupled hydrodynamic and ice forecast system for the Great Lakes that provides short-term predictions of ice concentration, thickness, and other parameters. This system relies on short-range weather forecasts to drive computer models of the lakes based on the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) and the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE). Recent research has shown that inclusion of overwater precipitation and formulation of landfast ice dynamics can improve ice prediction and provide commercial, recreational, and operational stakeholders with the information needed to avoid catastrophe.

Speaker bio

Dr. Eric J. Anderson (BS, PhD in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University) recently joined the Colorado School of Mines as an Associate Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering. Before joining Mines, Dr. Anderson spent fourteen years at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), where he and his team studied physical oceanographic and meteorological processes to support development of numerical forecast models for NOAA operations. For this work, he has received three Department of Commerce Bronze Medals, and in 2019, he received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

A Zoom link will also be available for this presentation. To receive the link contact Ge Jin at gjin@mines.edu or Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu.

 

September 15, 2021

Radar Modelling of Asteroid Bennu and the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft mission

Michael Nolan
OSIRIS-REx Science Team Chief
Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ

In person: CTLM 102

Abstract

Arecibo and Goldstone radar imaging of asteroid 101955 Bennu produced predictions about the shape and surface properties used in planning the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission. I will compare the observed properties of Bennu with predictions and discuss the implications for interpretation of other radar-observed asteroids.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Michael Nolan is a Research Professor at the University of Arizona and has been the Science Team Chief for the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission since 2015. For the 20 years preceding that, he was a staff member at the Arecibo Observatory working with the Planetary Radar, primarily in the study of asteroids and comets. He was observatory director from 2008 to 2011.

A Zoom link will also be available for this presentation. To receive the link contact Ge Jin at gjin@mines.edu or Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu.

September 22, 2021

Watching Rocks Recover: Monitoring Velocity Changes During Wave Propagation

Dr. Alison Malcolm
Associate Professor of Geophysics, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Virtual Presentation

Abstract 

When there is a large earthquake, or any large wave passing through a rock, it subtley changes the velocity of the rock.  This results in a delay in the traveltime of other waves traveling through the rock simultaneously.  These changes in traveltime are highly sensitive to the small-scale properties of the rock.  I will show how we monitor these property changes with lab experiments and discuss some of the many factors that influence these changes.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Alison Malcolm is an associate professor of Geophysics at Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN).  She studies wave propagation, with particular interest in uncertainty quantification for seismic imaging as well as nonlinear elasticity.  She enjoys lab work as well as computation, and she is particularly excited to work with young scientists to solve problems related to CO2 sequestration and to improve our physical understanding of waves and how they interact with materials and other waves.  Before joining the faculty at MUN, she spent six years as an assistant professor at MIT.  She obtained her PhD from the Center for Wave Phenomena at the Colorado School of Mines in 2005 and her BSc from the University of British Columbia in 2000. When she is not in the office or lab, she is outside with her family and friends.

Use the following Zoom link to view this presentation: https://mines.zoom.us/j/97650641229

If you have questions, please contact Ge Jin at gjin@mines.edu or Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu.

September 29, 2021

No Heiland lecture scheduled due to the SEG conference being held in Denver.

October 6, 2021

​Enhancing our Understanding of the Deep Mantle via 3D Global Waveform Modeling of Seismic Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

Dr. Neala Creasy
Post-doctoral Fellow, Colorado School of Mines Department of Geophysics

In-person presentation: CTLM 102

Abstract 

Plate tectonics is the surface expression of Earth’s convection mantle, resulting from the continuing cooling of the planet from its formation. Solid-state mantle convection drives subducting plates into the deep mantle, while driving plumes to the surface as hotspot volcanism. Earthquake seismology gives us the power to interrogate these deep processes and structures, such as the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (continent-sized features that hug the core mantle boundary of unknown origin). To investigate these features, I have used observations of seismic anisotropy from deep mantle seismic phases (e.g., SKS, SKKS, PKS, S, and ScS) using mineral physics modeling, ray theory, and the mantle flow model. In this talk, I discuss the limitations of ray theory when using these deep mantle phases using 3D numerical modeling with the global wave propagation solver SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002). The dominant period of body waves we are interested in is around 8-10s, where finite-frequency effects may become important. I illustrate how 3D wave propagation effects, such as mantle heterogeneities and the Earth’s Coriolis force, may limit our use of some of these underlying assumptions used to investigate deep mantle structures and seismic anisotropy and some remedies to avoid these complications.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Neala Creasy is an NSF postdoctoral fellow at the Colorado School of Mines. She studies deep Earth structure in the lower mantle and core with a focus in deep mantle seismic anisotropy, mantle convection, and mineral physics. She mainly prefers interdisciplinary work by publishing work using seismic observations, 3D waveform modeling, and diamond anvil cell mineral physics experiments. She is also passionate about mentorship and teaching. She volunteered at the Yale Peabody Natural History Museum for three years, teaching elementary school students. Additionally, she has mentored undergraduate interns for the IRIS undergraduate seismology internship program for two years. She obtained her PhD from Yale University in the Department of Geology and Geophysics (now the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences) in 2019 and her BSc from Michigan Technological University in 2014.

For those not on campus, there is a virtual link available. Please contact Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu for the link.

October 13, 2021

Impacts and Opportunities created by the Geophysical Sustainability Atlas

Maria Angela Capello
Cavaliere (OSI), Managing Director of Red Tree Consulting, LLC

In-person presentation: CTLM 102

Abstract

Everyday routine activities of geophysicists can be utilized, some with one slight modification, to help contribute to reducing their company’s carbon footprint and support the company’s long-term sustainability in every segment of human activities. From oil and gas exploration and production to humanitarian goals related to preparedness of the society for earthquakes or tsunamis, geophysicists play a pivotal role in advancing activities useful for economic development, as well as social development and environmental protection, the three pillars of sustainability.

Tools and techniques in mapping the subsurface to find and evaluate resources, or to monitor the utilization of groundwater, can be used for a variety of objectives that include not only the understanding of hydrocarbon reservoirs but also for the understanding of potential carbon storage and sequestration sites.  These actions are consistent with the goals outlined in the UN SDG which were expanded upon and mapped for the discipline of geophysics, shaping the Geophysical Sustainability Atlas (Capello et al., 2021).

This talk will help the geophysicist understand how operating in a more sustainable manner will have positive commercial impacts on their companies and how they can help their companies find ways to meet both the company’s goals as well as society’s sustainable development goals, taking as a case study the oil and gas companies in the most cost effective and efficient way by leveraging the geophysical toolkit to the (predominately seismic acquisition, processing and interpretation).

Speaker bio

Maria Angela Capello, is a renowned leader and author, expert in sustainability, Reservoir Management, Diversity and Inclusion, and Digital Transformation. She is a thought leader and step-changes provocateur that walks the talk in making things happen.

She is Co-Chair of the United Nations UNECE Committee for Women in Resource Management, and founding partner of Red Tree Consulting, LLC, a niche company she launched to advance sustainability initiatives. Capello is the lead author of two books: Learned in the Trenches: Insights into Leadership and Resilience (2018) and Mentoring and Sponsoring: Keys to Success (2020) and was the first woman to supervise seismic crews in the jungles of Venezuela, to advance a global career reaching leading roles in Kuwait Oil Company, Halliburton, and PDVSA. She has been Honorary Lecturer and Distinguished Lecturer for AAPG, SEG and SPE, the only professional ever selected to this role by these three societies.

Maria Angela Capello is a Cavaliere dell’Ordine della Stella d’Italia (Knight of the Order of the Star of Italy), the highest civil honor conferred by the President of Italy to Italians abroad. She is an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the top individual award of the SPE, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG).  She is a physicist from the Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela), a M.Sc. of the Colorado School of Mines (USA) and is certified in circular economy and sustainability by the University of Cambridge (UK).

For those not on campus, there is a virtual link available. Please contact Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu for the link.

 

 

October 20, 2021

Drivers of recent summertime surface warming events in the Southern Ocean

Earle Wilson
Post-doctoral Scholar, Environmental Science and Engineering Department, Caltech

Virtual presentation

Abstract

During the austral summers of early 2017 and 2020, the ice-free Southern Ocean experienced record-breaking highs in sea surface temperature (SST), ending a surface cooling trend that persisted over the preceding two decades. These surface warming anomalies are remarkable both in terms of their magnitude, with peak zonally-averaged SST anomalies exceeding 0.6 degC, and their spatial extent, spanning almost all longitudes of the Southern Ocean. Compared to the accompanying reductions in Antarctic sea ice, these surface warming events have received relatively little attention even though they drastically altered the ambient conditions of the water column during months of high biological productivity and strongly modified the surface stratification, which impacts the vertical exchange of carbon and the subduction of key water masses.

Here, we diagnose the mechanistic drivers of these summertime warming events using an observationally-based mixed layer heat budget. We find that these recent warming events were mainly facilitated by an anomalously shallow mixed layer, which trapped heat near the surface and further strengthened the near-surface stratification. In both the early 2017 and 2020 events, the upticks in SST were preceded by a brief period of weak westerly winds, which coincided with a strongly negative phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Additionally, both events followed El Nino events, which sustained anomalously warm SSTs across the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. We propose that the compounding effects of a negative SAM event, during late austral spring, and an El Nino event, during the months prior, are essential pre-cursors for these dramatic summertime warming events. Critically, if the Southern Ocean MLD shoals in a warming climate, we hypothesize that these short-timescale warming events will become more severe in the future.

Speaker bio

Dr. Earle Wilson is a physical oceanographer who is broadly interested in ocean dynamics, ice-ocean interactions, and the various ways these processes influence Earth’s climate. He is currently a post-doctoral scholar in the Environmental Science and Engineering Department at Caltech, where he works with Professor Andy Thompson. He completed his PhD in 2019 at University of Washington, School of Oceanography.

To receive the Zoom link for this presentation contact Ge Jin at gjin@mines.edu or Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu.

 

October 27, 2021

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Panacea or Indulgence?

Roelof Snieder
Professor of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines

In-person presentation: CTLM 102

Abstract 

Current events show that climate change is upon us. The mechanism of global warming was already explained fairly accurately by Arrhenius in 1896. An alternative to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by burning fewer fossil fuels is to capture CO2 and then store it in the subsurface. This technology relies on our expertise in injecting fluids in the subsurface and to monitor the fluids and their fate in the subsurface. In the geophysics community, this technology has been presented as “a well accepted leading mitigation strategy against climate change” (The Leading Edge, 20, 224, 2021). In order to understand to what extent this optimism is warranted, one needs to consider the following factors: (1) the amount of CO2 that needs to be captured and sequestered to have a significant impact on climate change, (2) the cost of CO2 capture and sequestration compared with other technologies for avoiding CO2 emissions, (3) the reason why CO2 capture is expensive and energy-intensive, and (4) the extreme accuracy with which CO2 in the subsurface needs to be monitored. As with many complicated problems, the devil is in the details, and we need to understand these details to assess the impact of carbon capture and storage that can be expected.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Roel Snieder holds the W.M. Keck Distinguished Chair of Professional Development Education at the Colorado School of Mines. He received in 1984 a Master’s degree in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University, and in 1987 a Ph.D. in seismology from Utrecht University. In 1993, he was appointed as professor of seismology at Utrecht University, where from 1997-2000 he served as Dean of the Faculty of Earth Sciences. Roel served on the editorial boards of Geophysical Journal International, Inverse Problems, Reviews of Geophysics, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and the European Journal of Physics. In 2000, he was elected as Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He is author of the textbooks  “A Guided Tour of Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences”, “The Art of Being a Scientist”, and “The Joy of Science” that are published by Cambridge University Press. In 2011, he was elected as Honorary Member of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and in 2014 he received a research award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. In 2016, Roel received the Beno Gutenberg Medal from the European Geophysical Union and the Outstanding Educator Award from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. He received in 2020 the Ange Melagro Prize for his outstanding class Science and Spirituality. From 2000-2014 he was a firefighter in Genesee Fire Rescue where he served for two years as Fire Chief.

For those not on campus, there is a virtual link available. Please contact Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu for the link.

 

November 3, 2021

Through the ocean to the mantle: Twenty thousand leagues under the seas with a fleet of floating seismic robots

Frederik J. Simons
Princeton University

In-person presentation: CTLM 102

Abstract

In the last few decades, seismologists have mapped the Earth’s interior (crust, mantle, and core) in ever increasing detail. Natural earthquakes, the sources of energy used to probe the Earth’s inside via seismic computerized tomography, occur mostly on tectonic plate boundaries. Seismometers, the receivers of earthquake wave motion, are located mostly on dry land. Such fundamentally inadequate ‘source-receiver’ coverage leaves large volumes inside the Earth entirely unexplored. Here be dragons! Placing seismic stations on the ocean bottom is among the solutions practiced successfully today. But there are exciting alternatives. Enter MERMAID: a fully autonomous marine instrument that travels deep below the ocean surface, recording global seismic activity – and marine environmental data – and reporting it by surfacing for satellite data transmission. This presentation will discuss a century of Earth imaging, a decade of instrument design and development, and a day in the life of exploring the challenging – and wet – places that our scientific journey has taken us.

Speaker bio

Frederik J Simons is a geophysicist at Princeton University. Usually from the safety of his office, he analyzes data from digital global seismic networks to study the physical properties of the interior of the solid Earth, and from gravity satellite missions to weigh the ice sheets melting off its surface. To help increase seismic station coverage around the globe, he has been leaving his comfort zone by launching floating earthquake recorders in the oceans, which he believes is the next wave in Earth observation, through the international initiative “EarthScope-Oceans”. Simons joined the Princeton faculty in 2006. He is also an associated faculty member in the Program in Applied & Computational Mathematics and serves on the Executive Committee of the Program in Archaeology. Between 2010 and 2013, Simons was the Dusenbury University Preceptor of Geological & Geophysical Sciences. Previously, he was a lecturer at University College London, a Princeton Council of Science & Technology Beck Fellow and a Department of Geosciences Hess Post-doctoral Fellow. Simons received a Ph.D. in Geophysics from M.I.T. and his M.Sc. in Geology from the KU Leuven in Belgium, of which he is a native.

For those not on campus, there is a virtual link available. Please contact Noelle Vance at nvance@mines.edu for the link.

 

November 10, 2021

Radar Sounders: Ice, Distributed Apertures, and Asteroid Tomography

Mark Haynes
Radar Science and Engineering Section at the NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Virtual Presentation

Abstract 

Low-frequency radar sounding instruments (10-500 MHz) are used to probe and image subsurface targets that are inaccessible to microwave and optical wavelengths. Targets include planetary and terrestrial ices sheets as well as comets and asteroids. Radar sounding has been used to probe the Mars polar ice caps and two sounding instruments are currently being developed to investigate the ice shells of Galilean moons (REASON on the NASA Europa Clipper Mission, and RIME on the ESA JUICE mission). In addition, the advent of small spacecraft and formation flying has led to new and growing interest in sparse distributed sounder formations to sound terrestrial ice sheets from Earth orbit, where a distributed array is used to suppress cross-track clutter signals inherent in traditional sounders with near-omnidirectional antennas. Finally, imaging the interiors of comets and asteroids continues to be a top priority for Solar System science and planetary defense and the development of radar instruments and missions capable of using advanced tomographic imaging methods continues to grow. This talk will discuss the speaker’s work on the REASON instrument (simulation of large domains, geometric fall-off of nadir-looking sounders, and artifacts in sounding interferometry), the opportunities and challenges of distributed sounder arrays, and current work in space-based and ground-based asteroid tomography.

Speaker Bio

Mark Haynes received B.S.E.-E.E. and B.M.A. (cello), M.S.E- E.E., and Ph.D.-Applied Physics degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2006, 2011, and 2012, respectively. From 2012 to 2013 he was a post-doctoral research associate with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California. Since 2013 he has been with the Radar Science and Engineering Section at the NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has worked on SWOT, AirSWOT, and REASON instruments and missions and is involved with technology development and future mission concepts in ground penetrating radar, distributed radar sounders and asteroid tomography. His research areas and interests are synthetic aperture radar, low-frequency radar sounding, tomography and interferometry, inverse scattering, electromagnetic simulation, and scientific computing all with applications in Earth science, planetary exploration and medical imaging. He was a recipient of the Pre-Doctoral Traineeship Fellowship at the Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Program, in 2008, and the NASA Honor Award Early Career Public Achievement Medal in 2018.

A virtual link is available. Contact gjin@mines.edu or nvance@mines.edu to receive it. 

November 17, 2021

Taking the Power of Exploration Geophysics from the Oil Patch to help Solve the World’s Grand Challenges

John Bradford
Vice President for Global Initiatives and Professor of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines; SEG 2021 Near Surface Global Lecturer

In person presentation: CTLM 102

Abstract

Geophysicists have an opportunity to utilize the most powerful computation, signal processing, and imaging tools developed in exploration geophysics and apply them to help solve several of society’s grand challenges. Over the past 20 years, our group has focused on subsurface imaging research to help address challenges in groundwater resources and to better understand the earth’s cryosphere. In particular, we have focused on marrying the tools of oil and gas exploration with imaging problems relevant to environmental geophysics. This talk will draw on this large body of work to explore how the geophysics profession can contribute solutions to society’s pressing problems. The discussion will be interwoven with an exploration of how we may better communicate what we do and how we may develop the next generation of geophysical leaders.

Speaker bio

John Bradford received dual BS degrees in Physics and Engineering Physics with a concentration in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kansas in 1994. He received his PhD in Geophysics from Rice University in 1999. In 2001, he joined the Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface at Boise State University where he served as director from 2006 to 2009. In 2017, he moved to the Colorado School of Mines where he served as the Geophysics Department Head until 2019, and Vice Provost and Dean from 2019 to 2020. He is currently Vice President for Global Initiatives and heads the Office of Global Initiatives and Business Development. He remains active in research and is focused on developing methodologies for quantitative analysis of near-surface seismic and ground-penetrating radar data with emphasis on using these tools to solve interdisciplinary science and engineering problems. He has published on a diverse array of topics that include hydrocarbon detection as both resource and environmental contaminant, geothermal characterization, hydrogeophysics, glaciology, and archaeology. In 2015/2016 he served as the President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

November 24, 2021

Thanksgiving Break – No Heiland lecture scheduled. 

December 1, 2021
Geophysical insights into Paleoproterozoic tectonics in the southern Superior Province, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

Dr. Benjamin Drenth
Research Geophysicist, U.S. Geological Survey

Virtual Presentation

Abstract

The southern part of the Archean Superior Province in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan was a nexus for key Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic tectonic events involved in the assembly and subsequent rifting of supercraton Superia, followed by complex orogenic processes related to the assembly of Laurentia. Interpretations of the region’s tectonomagmatic history have historically been hampered by extensive Pleistocene glacial and Paleozoic sedimentary cover and a lack of appropriate geophysical data. New aeromagnetic and gravity data provide a critical means of mapping and interpreting the complex geological framework through cover, allowing development of significantly richer geographical and process-based perspectives on all these tectonic events. This presentation will focus on recent USGS research along the southern margin of the Superior Province, as well as related topics of interest in the broader region. A major point of emphasis will be the contributions of modern potential field data to understanding the tectonomagmatic evolution of this important region.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Ben Drenth is a Research Geophysicist in the U.S. Geological Survey’s Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry Science Center in Denver, Colorado. His research is focused on the interpretation of gravity and magnetic geophysical data, in conjunction with other types of geophysical data and geologic information, to address geologic framework problems at a variety of scales. Ben earned a BS in geological engineering from Michigan Technological University, a MS in geophysics from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a PhD in geophysics from the University of Oklahoma.

Contact gjin@mines.edu or nvance@mines.edu to receive a Zoom link to this presentation.

 

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