Welcome to Geophysics

The world of geophysics is enormous and fascinating.  Many are attracted to geophysics because of their fascination with earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other natural hazards.  Others are drawn by their interest in hot topics such as climate change, carbon management and geothermal energy.  Still others love the process of discovery associated with exploration – petroleum exploration, mineral exploration, exploration for water, or planetary exploration.

The Department of Geophysics offers the B.S. degree in geophysical engineering and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in both geophysics and geophysical engineering.  Our academic programs encompass many interesting fields of study, including physics, mathematics, geology, computer science, signal processing, and much, much more.  Students interested in engineering are hired by groundwater, environmental, and subsurface construction firms.  Students who are more interested in applied science pursue academic positions or employment by government agencies such as the United States Geological Survey or NASA, or take jobs in industries such as petroleum, mining, or renewable energy.

We invite you to come join us in the excitement of exploring our planet and beyond!

Geophysics is seeing and sensing remotely

beneath the surface of the earth, in the atmosphere, in the oceans, in our solar system.

CSM's Department of Geophysics

  • International reputation for excellence in applied geophysics.
  • Oldest and broadest program of applied geophysics in North America.
  • One of only two U.S universities offering a B.S. in Geophysical Engineering.
  • 50-50 balance between undergraduates/graduates, and between research/teaching.

Serving Colorado, the Nation, the World

Geophysics, along with other geoscience and engineering disciplines, is relevant to solving important problems locally and globally:

Characterizing aquifer dynamics in the Western US
Exploring for water for the 20% of Earth’s population that lacks it

Characterizing soil, assessing irrigation in precision agriculture

Exploring and developing oil and gas, coal, coal bed methane, geothermal

Investigating sites for subsurface construction, tunneling
Locating and characterizing underground infrastructure and utilities

Exploring for mineral resources and characterizing in situ and mine leach processes

Monitoring, non-invasively, the utility infrastructure: natural gas, water, telecommunications, roads, railroads

Isolating toxic (nuclear, chemical) waste
Locating land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO)

Monitoring, forecasting, and mitigating risks associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, avalanches, tsunamis.
Understanding climate change and its implications

Exploring the planets, e.g., looking for water on Mars

Using non-invasive methods to locate subsurface sites/structures/artifacts



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Last Updated: 08/17/2015 10:38:42